Intraocular Lenses

The first intraocular lens was implanted by Harold Ridley in 1949. The English ophthalmologist placed a disk-shaped lens made of PMMA inside the posterior chamber of a 45-year-old woman’s eye after a cataract surgery. Of course, developing complications such as glaucoma, uveitis and lens dislocation stopped him from designing these lenses. Since then, ophthalmologists have always been looking for more appropriate lenses in terms of tissue compatibility, lower posterior capsule opacification (PCO) rates and better visual acuity for patients. Today, with the advancement of technology, intraocular lenses have also improved and become more complicated. For instance, special lenses such as blue-light filtering lenses, aspheric lenses, multifocal lenses, and toric lenses have been developed, each to meet the needs of a large group of patients.

Unlike contact lenses that always need care and maintenance, intraocular lenses are permanent with no need to daily care. Tehran-Iran Noor Eye Hospital is one of the first medical centers in the country to perform intraocular lens implantation.

Features of Intraocular Lenses

- Biocompatibility of intaocular lenses materials with the human eye

- Adoptive optics of simulation of intaocular lenses

- Mechanical ompatibility of intaocular lenses materials with the human eye

- Extremely high flexibility

Common Types of Intraocular Lenses

Monofocal or Single-Focal Lenses

These types of lenses reduce or permanently eliminate the need for glasses to correct distance vision. However, monofocal lens wearers will need eyeglasses for reading.

Multifocal Lenses

The need for glasses is reduced or eliminated in people who wear these lenses, both for distance and near visions.

Toric Lenses for Astigmatism

Astigmatism causes distance or near vision to be blurred or distorted to some degree at all distances. In people with astigmatism, the cornea is not round and regular; it is often egg-shaped which has different radii of curvature in the vertical and horizontal planes. These lenses are a good choice for correcting or reducing the astigmatism.

Note: By implanting toric lenses in cataract surgery in patients with astigmatism, in addition to myopia and hyperopia, astigmatism is also corrected in most cases. Therefore, the patient does not usually need to wear distance glasses after the surgery.

Aspheric Lenses

With these lenses, a better contrast is created in the image, which results in a better visibility.

Blue light Filtering Ophthalmic Lenses

These lenses block out high-energy blue light, ultraviolet rays. These two spectra of light are present in natural and artificial light; thus they increase the quality of vision and protect natural visual system against ultraviolet rays.

Intraocular lens surgery, like other surgical procedures, may be associated with some risks such as eye infections, resulting in the enucleation of the eye, lens loosening, lens rotation and movement, eye inflammation, and seeing halos around light at night. Even though eyeglasses are replaced by intraocular lenses in some patients, many other patients will still need to wear glasses after the surgery and implantation of intraocular lenses, in order to do things such as reading.

The ophthalmologists of Tehran-Iran Noor Eye Hospital offer the patients more information about the variety and functions of different types of intraocular lenses.

Preoperative Care

- Blood and cardiovascular tests

- Antibiotic eye drops 1 to 2 days before surgery (based on your ophthalmologist's advice)

- Continue to take medications such as antihypertensive drugs (based on your ophthalmologist's advice)

- Do not eat for 12 hours before the surgery - Bring someone with you on the day of surgery

Postoperative Care

- Perform a follow-up appointment 24 hours after the surgery (very important)

- Doing light daily activities is allowed except for patients with special conditions. In this case, the ophthalmologists of Tehran Noor Eye Hospital will provide the patient with necessary advice. Using anti-inflammatory and antibiotic eye drops based on your ophthalmologist's opinion.

Q: What is the most important advantage of using intraocular lenses instead of contact lenses?

Q: Are intraocular lenses compatible with the natural tissue of the human eye?

Q: What are the differences between mono­focal and multifocal lenses?

Q: Are intraocular lenses used to correct astigmatism?

Q: Is the effectiveness of intraocular lenses changed by aging?

Q: How are intraocular lenses implanted in the eye?

Q: Are intraocular lenses used in cataract treatment?

 

 

 

 

Q: What is the most important advantage of using intraocular lenses instead of contact lenses?

A: The most advantages of intraocular lenses than contact lenses are being permanent and having no need for daily care and maintenance.

 

Q: Are intraocular lenses compatible with the natural tissue of the human eye?

A: Yes. These lenses are made of materials compatible with the natural tissue of human eye. In addition to high flexibility, these lenses have high mechanical and optical qualities.

 

Q: What are the differences between mono­focal and multifocal lenses?

A: If a person wears monofocal lenses, he/she does not need glasses to correct distance vision. but the person has to wear glasses for reading.

 

Q: Are intraocular lenses used to correct astigmatism?

A: Yes. Toric lenses are a good choice for correcting or reducing astigmatism.

 

Q: Is the effectiveness of intraocular lenses changed by aging?

A: Major changes occur in human molecular and cellular structures with age. As a result, some types of lenses may be subject to change.

 

Q: How are intraocular lenses implanted in the eye?

A: These lenses are implanted in the patient’s eye using local anesthetic eye drops in the operating rooms of Tehran Noor Eye Hospital in Iran.

 

Q: Are intraocular lenses used in cataract treatment?

A: Yes. Intraocular lenses are the most commonly used in cataract treatment. In fact the eye’s natural lens is replaced by an intraocular lens. this preocedure is performed in Tehran-Iran Noor Eye Hospital.